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Jay-Z takes a knee (on the black community's neck)

Internets, I've come to expect more from Jay-Z, despite his post-Vol. 2: Hard Knock Life output, so I
Jay-Z takes a knee (on the black community's neck)
By Byron Crawford • Issue #121 • View online
Internets,
I’ve come to expect more from Jay-Z, despite his post-Vol. 2: Hard Knock Life output, so I was both surprised and saddened to see that Roc Nation has entered into a partnership with the NFL, despite many black people on Twitter claiming to be done with the league, after what it did to Colin Kaepernick.
The primary purpose of this partnership is to force artists into performing at NFL events, like the Super Bowl. The NFL was having a hard time finding artists for this year’s Super Bowl, hard enough that they ended up having to go with Maroon 5 and Travis Scott. If they couldn’t get those two, they may have had to go with Train and iLoveMakonnen. It was slim pickings!
You don’t get paid anything to perform at the Super Bowl, and if you’re black, you end up looking like a sellout, because the NFL is run by racist Trump supporters. They blackballed Colin Kaepernick for taking a knee during the national anthem to protest police shootings of unarmed black men, which must mean that they support police shootings of unarmed black men.
Cardi B, who’s a Bernie Bro, reportedly turned down an invitation to perform at this year’s Super Bowl halftime show, as did Rihanna, a fervent supporter of the Palestinian cause. Jay-Z tried to front like he wasn’t willing to perform. On that album he dropped with Beyoncé, which no one listened to, he claimed to have turned down the Super Bowl, but more so because he was already playing stadiums.
Similarly, in the press conference to announce this partnership, he clarified that when he tried to talk Travis Scott out of performing, it was because he didn’t like the idea of Scott playing second fiddle to Maroon 5, who should be playing the same hotel banquet rooms as Color Me Badd, at this point, not because of the whole Colin Kaepernick thing.
Now that Roc Nation is curating the Super Bowl halftime show, they can coerce artists into appearing. Even if they aren’t signed to Roc Nation management, Roc Nation can insist on them performing at the Super Bowl as a condition of them appearing on any tours sponsored by Roc Nation parent company Live Nation, and any radio stations owned by iHeartMedia, which I’m pretty sure is owned by the same people.
Essentially, the racist CACs who run the NFL just bought access to pretty much anyone they’d want to perform during a Super Bowl halftime show, and as was the case with their confidential settlement with Kaepernick, they probably didn’t pay nearly as much as you’d think.
Not that Jay-Z needs the money. It was recently announced that he now has a billion dollars. Granted, it was announced in Forbes, which just pulls those numbers out of its ass. Wasn’t 50 Cent like third on the Forbes list when he filed for bankruptcy? He even had a song about how he was third on the Forbes list.
It’s a known fact that some people lobby Forbes for placement on those lists. The president, for example, used to call Forbes and tell them his name was John Baron, that he was Donald Trump’s publicist, and that the future president definitely *wasn’t* broke. It seems to have worked: I’m pretty sure Trump was still on the Forbes list—the real Forbes list—when he lost all of his money in Atlantic City.
Jay-Z may have lobbied Forbes to announce that he’s now a billionaire, and he may have been inspired to do so by Kylie Jenner, who supposedly made a billion dollars from a line of lipstick that gives which chicks DSLs, which probably doesn’t even work (it seems too good to be true).
Anyway, I’m sure he has plenty of money. He’s not at risk of having to file for bankruptcy to avoid paying a settlement for a sex tape he posted on the Internets. And you can’t really achieve anything financially once you’ve got a billion dollars. No one’s ever had a trillion dollars, except maybe Jeffrey Epstein, and I shudder to think what he had to do to get it, let alone what he did once he had it.
Take it easy on yourself,
Bol

 

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